I’m in! Runner’s World Run Streak #RWRunStreak

I remember my marathoner cousin telling me about this last year. The Runner’s World Run Streak. 

From Thanksgiving to New Years.

One mile.

Every day.

No excuses.

I told her I run through the winter so I didn’t feel the need to do it. For me, the weather is no obstacle. My runners have gone through ice, rain, hail and storms.

photoA shot during my run last Sunday.

My friend Anne Marie gave a good reminder on her website about it. Forgetful me!

This year I’m heading away to PA for the holidays, and will have a pretty jam packed schedule. Also with full days in the city, I thought the #RWRunStreak would prove challenging this season.

So off to the races! Well, with myself.

Are you going to take the challenge? If running every day isn’t too realistic now, have a look at Anne Marie’s twist to the challenge. It’s friendly for every activity level. Try it out and make sure to keep her in the loop if you decide to do it.

Happy running in the fluffy white stuff,

Jessie

Every runner needs to spend time at the side of the road

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Every time I cross the finish line I get a rush. A buzz. A natural high.

I’ve attended one race prior to today’s events as a spectator. But this morning I took it up a notch with my first experience “running people in”.

“Running people in” means being the personal cheerleader for your teammates as they complete the final stretch of their race. You can run someone in at any distance really. When they are drained with achy legs, it is your job to provide support in any way they need it.

After run club one morning I got into a conversation with two of my favourite fellow runners Margaret and Hazel. They spoke about the struggle towards the end of their last 10k race, and I offered to help “run them in” for this one.

As the gun went off, I stood at a visible spot cheering for everyone I did know but also those who I didn’t. I held up my neon pink sign which on one side read, “I’m a stranger but I’m so proud of you”.

When I saw Margaret and Hazel make the corner, I flipped my sign and yelled as loud as I could. “Margaret and Hazel’s #1 Fan!”

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They passed me in high spirits, and I then walked to the 7km mark of their 10k race. I eagerly awaited their arrival, and when we met, I felt a little nervous.

How many times should I say encouraging things and when do I stay quiet? Do I really push them or is my job to just accompany them?

In my own head during races it’s a delicate balance of self encouragement but also tough love. And since I’ve been diagnosed  with type 1 diabetes, it’s been hard to understand when my body needs to push or if pulling back is what I need to stay strong till the end.

So I stayed as quiet as I could, but every once and a while would try to encourage them both in whatever way I could.

Way to go! Keep going! We’re almost there!

Then I would sometimes try to distract them. “Hey look at that sign” “Isn’t the fall leaves pretty?”

For part of the run I carried the sign I made for them on my back. I ran in front of them, instructing them to look at the sign or my feet.

I remembered that during a nasty run in the dead of winter, my cousin was pushing me to keep up with him. It was blizzarding and we were the only ones out on the road. He ran in front of me and said, “Just look at my feet. Match my steps, and just focus.” It carried me all the way home, so I opted to give the same advice.

Hazel was looking strong towards the end and I was running with Margaret who was not far behind. Towards the end of the race, another runner from our club named Jack came and grabbed Margaret’s hand. She grabbed mine and together we crossed the finish line.

I had never felt that kind of joy after a race. I got no medal, and I ran 3km in total for the whole day. However when I saw how happy they both were to have made such a strong finish, I was elated. They both made PB’s too!

It was that, coupled with all the thank you’s from strangers this morning, that makes me confident that I’ll be out there again…not gearing for a PB or to complete a certain distance, but to be a cheerleader.

Thank you to all those who have ever come to cheer during a race. It’s time to pay it forward and do the same. Hazel and Margaret continually thanked me after the race but really, I should be thanking them. They gave me such a positive experience and I’m grateful to have had the honour of running in two wonderful friends. I’ll never forget it!

My ScotiaBank Waterfront Toronto Half-Marathon Race Report

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You: This entry looks long. What is it really about?

Me: This is a race report, summarizing my training, but more importantly focusing on actual race day. It explains what I learned, what went wrong, and what I should certainly do again. It’s meant to be a personal guide so my next race will be even better. This was my first half-marathon, done a year and three months after being diagnosed with t1d.

I hope this will help other newly diagnosed type 1’s on their fitness journey. You can do any distance you want, any race you want. It’ll take a lot of prep, but anything is possible. Don’t let your broken pancreas stop you from anything.

Goal: Complete the Scotiabank Waterfront Half Marathon feeling good!

Goal completed? YES! Finished in 2:39:10, no medic tents and great bg’s *happy dance*

Lessons learned: 

  • Cross training is essential for running or any other sport you decide to do
  • Be patient. Really patient. What works one day won’t work another day. Enjoy the little victories and don’t dwell on the bad numbers or yucky runs. If you have a type A personality like me, this will really drive you up the wall. Stay strong!
  • Don’t listen to anyone else. Only you know your body. Everyone has an opinion about what you should be doing and many times those people don’t have your disease and don’t know even know what type 1 diabetes really is anyways. So smile, say thank you (because they mean well), and in one ear…out the other.
  • Plan for sick days/weeks and allow enough wiggle room in your training to rest and recover if need be
  • Don’t eat/drink ANYTHING new on race day, stick to what you know
  • Warm up. I preach this all the time and yet on race day, I did not do this. I could have saved myself 3km’s of grief.
  • Bring clothes you can throw away after you get warmed up
  • Be prepared for your bg’s to do anything they want to. I was so surprised at how many carbs I consumed. My body was just burning up everything. In future I need to carry a lot more with me
  • Bring your support team. At the end when you are really drained, your support team cheering will carry you home.
  • Write race report RIGHT after the race or you’ll forget the details

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How I got to the start line (aka. training): 

Before I started training for the half-marathon, I was coming off of my first two try-a-tri’s (that’s a mini triathlon 400m swim-10km bike ride-2.5km run) that took place at the end of July/early August. Prior to that, I took part in an triathlon training clinic that had me exercising about 5 times a week (on top of my usual weights at the gym, roughly 3 times a week).

Since I had never done a triathlon before, my body was definitely feeling strong and getting solid from all the cross training. I believe this provided a great base for me. By working other parts of my body aside from running muscles, it made me a better runner.

Key Lesson: Everything is Connected. 

After the two triathlons I felt like I needed to play catchup. The half marathon clinic my friends were part of was in full swing and I had missed a significant portion of it. I ran on my own and tried to follow a general schedule. I was frequently going low and remedied the situation by taking no insulin prior to runs and 50 per cent less post runs. I got to this after many long meetings with my team at the hospital and LOTS of trial and error. LOTS.

I eliminated hill training and speedwork as after many attempts, it just made me feel sick. My numbers would spike and since I have a really tight range of bg’s at the moment, it made me go high and I would feel like vomiting. One scary run took place when I tried to attempt a faster-than-a-jog 3k. I upped my speed just a tad (I miss running at a faster speed since being diagnosed) but by the time I made it home I fell to the floor and was dry heaving in a dizzy mess. That was my tipping point where I said enough is enough and to just not push too hard. I have a hard time giving myself a break with these things so that was a huge breakthrough that my goal should be to have fun and enjoy the process.

Capital F for Frustration

I found it extremely frustrating and at times, I just wanted to take off my running shoes and hurl them into the air (but I didn’t. Because I love my running shoes. And they are expensive). Sometimes I felt like all I was doing was going in circles. Test, eat what I thought was a lot of carbs pre-run, run, test, felt dizzy, thinking “am I low or just tired?”, stop, test…

I’m tired from just writing it out. Let’s just get it out there. When I ran on my own I broke down. A lot. All I wanted was my body to just co-operate. But no. My pancreas was like Newman from Seinfeld, coming in and disturbing me at the most inopportune times.

As I was and still am in a type of honeymoon phase (that’s when your pancreas is still working somewhat, and it’s never consistent), it made it even more difficult to calculate my insulin and how many carbs I needed for each workout.

What’s worse is that I was dealing with the post frustrations of guessing three different kinds of exercise for the triathlon. I think my patience was running out.

Correction, I KNEW my patience was running out.

Go away flu. No time for you. 

Then came the flu.

It was my first time getting the flu since being diagnosed. It seemed to have lasted three weeks.

Realizations include: not all medicine is carb free, it takes much longer to recover from the flu, my blood glucose levels were significantly higher and dehydration can creep up on you, so drink lots of water.

It was a huge interruption to my training. I tried a few times to run and push my body but it wasn’t having any of it.

Finally I came out of it but by then there were only a few weeks left before the half.

I did some long runs running a lot slower than I would have but I managed to get them in so hurrah!

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Race Day: 

Woke up around 5:15 a.m. as I had to be on the bus by 6:30 a.m. I ate my usual breakfast (coffee with two stevia packets and almonst milk, one slice of gluten-free toast with almond butter, with chia seeds sprinkled on top).

Disclaimer: if you don’t want to hear about digestion issues, please skip to Start Line. 

Before I left the house I went to the washroom as usual. I was happy! Typically for races I get nervous and can’t go. However by the time I got down to the race site I had to again. And again. It was not fun. I was happy that my system was empty however I was worried that this pattern would continue well into the race. Luckily it didn’t.

Start Line. 

Stayed near the 2:45 pace bunny as I thought that would be a realistic time to follow. I was estimating I would finish around 3  hours if all went well (so my final time was a surprise!). Bonus: it wasn’t too cold.

The first 3k were so painful. Because I didn’t warm up and it was slightly cold, my calves just seized up. I could barely keep up with the 2:45 pace bunny and I just kept thinking to myself, “I don’t know how I’m suppose to run a half marathon. This hurts too much.” Luckily my legs got warmed up and I was able to keep going.

Never try new things on race day

Was feeling fine, testing and downing Gatorade at each stop including water, which worked out wonderfully. Again, I didn’t take any Gatorade during training runs. I also downed a PowerGel having never tried it before. I now realize this could have caused some major gut rot.

13k my right knee started to feel very painful. It got to the point where I was hobbling on it. It was hurting with every step. I don’t know if I eventually became numb to the pain or it went away, but either way, I worked my way through it.

The last km was such a rush. I got a bolt of energy. I saw my Connected in Motion friends first! I gave them both sweaty hugs. Then I saw my cousin, then some run club friends. I was on a high! I sprinted the last stretch and was so happy.

Post race I had a banana, and half a can of Coke and my numbers were still good. I was afraid of going low before bed so I ate a lot and was subsequently high but I think it’s worth it going to bed at 13 after your first half when you don’t know what on earth will happen as you sleep. I’d take that over having a low.

I’m not sure if I’ve covered everything but this is what I’ve got so far. If you have any questions, let me know. Good luck on your fitness journey and let me know how you exercise with t1d 🙂

Race Day bg summary (mmo/L)

*food/water times are mostly guessed for actual race time

5:24 a.m. 6.4 wakeup/before breakfast

-1 coffee w/ two Stevia packets, almond milk

one slice gluten-free toast with almond butter and chia seeds sprinkled on top

7:00a.m.

-one granola bar

8:28 a.m. 5.4 (last check before race)

-ate another mini Lara Bar

gatorade and water

chocolate PowerGel

10:12 a.m. 5.2

-gatorade and water

-ate mini Lara Bar

11:20 a.m. 5.7

-Lara Bar

-gatorade and water

12:13 p.m. 6.6

-banana

-1/2 bottle of Coke (tasted so good)

1:22 p.m. 6.8 (before lunch)

-gyros wrap, french fries

-50 per cent less insulin

4:03 p.m. 5.8 (after lunch)

6:09 p.m. 4.7 (before dinner)

9:26 p.m. 6.7

-I can’t remember but must have ate up a storm

11:56 p.m. 13.6

Next day 5.6 morning bg

Please share with me your race experiences. Thanks for reading