Becoming a JDRF Adult Support Group Regular

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I’m committed to going on the regular. 2016 is the year of consistency, and for me, that means attending the JDRF adult support group every month. I went in December and tonight and I can say for me the pros definitely outweigh the cons.

Perspective: Although I still feel new and often lost at times within the bunch (in person and online)-I get to meet others who are at all different stages: the veterans, the newly diagnosed, it’s really a mixed bag and it offers a lot of different perspectives.

The greatest advantage is walking away after a few hours and knowing I was in a room with a bunch of people who just get it. I can’t really put a price on that or even describe the magnitude of that pro but let’s just say it’s pretty big for me. Let me stuff my face with cookie crumbs hanging from my lip. Taking 5 pee breaks during the session. No explanation needed.

Mentally, it gives me a power up. Like in Mario!

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And now that I’ve been to the meetings enough times, my name card is set out on the table and I know a lot of faces who come to the table. I’m not as nervous as before and I can tell physically that my body is more relaxed. I’m not worrying about how I look or if I’m slouching. I’m just Jess.

That type of familiarity is especially important to me since there has been so much change in my life the last while.

We all want to feel we belong. We all want to be acknowledged. And this group does just that for me.

Next week I have a date with two type 1 friends and when I take inventory, a lot of my close friends now are people living with type 1. That, including some of the interaction I have with people on social media, I have to say there’s a community in-person and online that adds up to something I can’t take for granted in 2016.

This will be a big year for me in so many ways, and with a good team, new endocrinologist and hospital (which I have yet to meet, fingers crossed), place, and fresh new business adventures, it will be one big ride.

Has a support group helped you? Who is part of your diabetes community?

Sending lots of support to you need it, and even if you feel you don’t.

I will do everything -right- and my blood sugars will still do whatever it wants. I will have huge victories and sometimes feel defeated. no matter what though, every day i'm going to set out to try. i will think about how i want my life to

XO,

Jess

 

 

How beautiful! A classic medieval silhouette and I can’t wear it.

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Can we talk about this dress and maybe gawk at it for a little? What a gorgeous piece. I wish I could put it on and do a fun photoshoot.

I saw this on Etsy and just had to share for #BlueFridays.

Every Friday we put on our blue accessories, clothes or whatever to celebrate and support those living with diabetes.

The #BlueFridays hash tag all started with Cherise Shockley. Check out how the initiative started here.

Wishing I was back in time,

J

DSMA Blue Fridays- the dress with all the detail

I hit the jackpot with this dress. Sequence, beading, more beading, gold? Oh my!

I show you guys an outfit at the end of each week for Blue Fridays.

Sport any kind of blue on…well…Fridays to show your support for those affected by diabetes.

 

Show me your blue outfit pics, hashtag it #BlueFridays and share!

Happy Friday,

Jess

DSMA Blue Fridays: Summertime blues

Thrift store dress rack find. It’s blue stripes for summer lounging.

Every Friday we put on blue to support those affected by diabetes. Here’s this week’s dress.

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Use #BlueFridays to participate! It’s a fun hashtag to accompany your #ootd (outfit of the day).

Read more about the Blue Fridays initiative here.

Summer time sadness? (If you don’t get this reference I’m a little sad.)

J

 

DSMA Blue Friday: My Disney princess dress

All I need is a crown and a wand with this Blue Friday dress.

Every Friday we wear blue to support those affected by diabetes. Today’s outfit is inspired by the magical. It’s part of my weekly fashion photo shoot at local thrift stores around Toronto.

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The Blue Fridays initiative was created by Cherise Shockley in November 2010. Read more about it here.

If you’re wearing blue, snap a photo and hashtag it #BlueFriday on your social media outlets.

Dressed like a princess and pretty happy about it,

Jess

DSMA Blue Fridays: Hold that dress up.

Every Friday I show you a new, blue outfit. This week’s dress had a plunging JLo neckline. So, please excuse my hand-to-heart posing.

On Fridays we wear blue to support those affected by diabetes. It’s called, appropriately so, Blue Fridays! Read more here.

So get on the bandwagon, put on some blue, take a selfie and hashtag it #BlueFridays.

Are you wearing blue today?

J

How can we help people with diabetes in a social media world?

I feel grateful that I grew up in a time where Facebook didn’t exist.

Twitter wasn’t a word and a ‘double tap’ could at best mean two faucet handles in a bathroom sink (one hot one cold, anyone remember?).

I can’t imagine all my silly decisions and “lesson learned” moments being so readily available for my peers and the world to see through social media.

Now this is going to make me sound old, but the power of words has also taken a different turn. People young and old can say whatever they want without it ever being traced back to them. There’s a loss in accountability. It’s one thing to tell someone (as they stand trembling with tears in their eyes) that they are ugly, worthless and that they should die, and quite another to do it behind a screen. Both are horrid though. I don’t need to tell you how bad cyber bullying has gotten.

Imagine what life would be like if people spoke as they wrote online? smh. <–that’s stands for ‘smack/shake my head’

Technology is a wonderful tool, but it also makes an impact we have yet to fully understand for the younger generation.

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I see this all the time on all channels: a toxic combination of relentless anger, resentment and dark depression about living with diabetes. Someone made an incorrect assumption about diabetes, attack! Oh they didn’t specify type 1? Attack!

Don’t get me wrong, it’s annoying and of course feels personal when someone is miseducated about diabetes. Unfortunately blasting someone online doesn’t go very far even if you’re trying to educate them. Being hostile doesn’t set the tone for someone to open up their mind to what you have to say. From my observation, it’s an unfortunate cycle that never seems to end.

It’s saddening to read what seems to be a manifestation of pain, but it’s also a window into the minds of what some of these young people are going through. 

Maybe these angry diabetics aren’t REALLY angry and are exaggerating. Maybe not. Either way, it’s a cry for attention and they are screaming every which way.

Being on social media has opened me up to a world that I’ve never lived in before, and it’s scary. A world where some don’t take insulin because they are too embarrassed to do so in public. The burnout, ignoring diabetes for months on end, the shame, the guilt.

I understand fully that in real life, people are also more quick to complain and not as ready to celebrate the little joys in this world. I get that. But that doesn’t deter from the fact that it’s still a problem.

 

How do we educate the younger generation into a world of acceptance, responsibility, and a little less anger towards the uneducated and ignorant? How do we promote peace, understanding and use social media for good? I don’t claim to know the answers but what I do know is talking about it openly is the first step.

A lot of this is already happening but I think it needs to happen more. We need to talk to our health care professionals, diabetes companies, caregivers, teachers, anyone who will listen about what it’s like to live with diabetes (of any kind) in a social media world and what we observe.

There are fantastic resources online such as the DOC (Diabetes Online Community), live chats, and wonderful systems of support which need to be acknowledged. Wonderful bloggers and organizations are out there educating, supporting and providing much-needed help in the cyber universe. How do we harness all this good? By telling people about it.

We need to be more open-minded and learn how these kids are growing up with diabetes in a world consumed by social media.

© t1dactiveliving.com All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

 

DSMA Blue Fridays: Forget black and yellow. Here’s blue and black.

It’s a body hugging blue-and-black striped number. Soft material, ultra comfy and not my style at all but here it is anyways!

Every Friday we wear blue to support those affected by diabetes. Read more about the Blue Fridays initiative here.

Next time you are thinking about what to wear to kick off the weekend, consider being a #BlueFridays ambassador of fashion!

Have a great weekend everyone,

J

© t1dactiveliving.com All Rights Reserved.

DSMA Blue Fridays: dark nights outfit

It’s backkkkkk.

Put on your favourite kind of blue on the last work day of the week, take a selfie and hashtag it #BlueFridays

We wear blue on Fridays to support those affected by diabetes. Read more here.

This dress is another thrift store find.

Perfect for dark nights and city lights.

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Are you wearing blue today?

J